Design of a 96 Decibel operational amplifier and other problems for which a computer program evolved by genetic programming is competitive with human performance.   [GP]

by

Koza, J., R., Andre, D., Bennett III, F., H. and Keane, M., A.

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Info: Proceedings of l996 Japan-China Joint International Workshop on Information Systems (Conference proceedings), 1996, p. 30-49
Keywords:genetic algorithms, genetic programming
Abstract:
It would be desirable if computers could solve problems without the need for a human to write the detailed programmatic steps. That is, it would be desirable to have a domain-independent automatic programming technique [AP] in which "What You Want Is What You Get" ("WYWIWYG" ­p; pronounced "wow-eee-wig"). Genetic programming [GP] is such a technique. This paper surveys three recent examples of problems (one from the field of cellular automata [CA] and two from the fields of molecular biology) in which genetic programming [GP] evolved a computer program that produced results that were slightly better than human performance for the same problem. This paper then discusses a fourth problem in greater detail and demonstrates that a design for a low-distortion 96 decibel op amp (including both topology and component sizing) can be evolved using genetic programming. [GP] The information that the user must supply to genetic programming [GP] consists of the parts bin (transistors, resistors, and capacitors) and the fitness measure [FM] for the major operating characteristics of an op amp.
Notes:
Invited paper
URL(s):Postscript
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BibTex:
@InProceedings{koza:1996:96db,
  author =       "John R. Koza and David Andre and Forrest H {Bennett
                 III} and Martin A. Keane",
  title =        "Design of a 96 Decibel operational amplifier and other
                 problems for which a computer program evolved by
                 genetic programming is competitive with human
                 performance.",
  booktitle =    "Proceedings of l996 Japan-China Joint International
                 Workshop on Information Systems",
  year =         "1996",
  editor =       "Mitsuo Gen and Weixuan Zu",
  pages =        "30--49",
  address =      "Ashikaga",
  month =        "4-16 " # oct,
  organisation = "Ashikaga Institute of Technology",
  keywords =     "genetic algorithms, genetic programming",
  URL =          "http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~koza/Ashikaga96dB.ps",
  abstract =     "It would be desirable if computers could solve
                 problems without the need for a human to write the
                 detailed programmatic steps. That is, it would be
                 desirable to have a domain-independent automatic
                 programming technique in which {"}What You Want Is What
                 You Get{"} ({"}WYWIWYG{"} ­p; pronounced
                 {"}wow-eee-wig{"}). Genetic programming is such a
                 technique. This paper surveys three recent examples of
                 problems (one from the field of cellular automata and
                 two from the fields of molecular biology) in which
                 genetic programming evolved a computer program that
                 produced results that were slightly better than human
                 performance for the same problem. This paper then
                 discusses a fourth problem in greater detail and
                 demonstrates that a design for a low-distortion 96
                 decibel op amp (including both topology and component
                 sizing) can be evolved using genetic programming. The
                 information that the user must supply to genetic
                 programming consists of the parts bin (transistors,
                 resistors, and capacitors) and the fitness measure for
                 the major operating characteristics of an op amp.",
  notes =        "Invited paper",
}