Duplication of Coding Segments in Genetic Programming   [CS] [GP]

by

Haynes, T.

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Info: Proceedings of the Thirteenth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (Conference proceedings), 1996
Abstract:
Research into the utility of non--coding segments, [NS] or introns, in genetic--based encodings has shown that they expedite the evolution of solutions in domains by protecting building blocks [BB] against destructive crossover. We consider a genetic programming system [GP] where non--coding segments [NS] can be removed, and the resultant chromosomes returned into the population. This parsimonious repair leads to premature convergence, [PC] since as we remove the naturally occurring non--coding segments, [NS] we strip away their protective backup feature. We then duplicate the coding segments [CS] in the repaired chromosomes, and place the modified chromosomes into the population. The duplication method significantly improves the learning rate in the domain we have considered. We also show that this method can be applied to other domains.
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BibTex:
@InProceedings{Haynes:1996:DCSb,
  author =       "Thomas Haynes",
  title =        "Duplication of Coding Segments in Genetic
                 Programming",
  booktitle =    "Proceedings of the Thirteenth National Conference on
                 Artificial Intelligence",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1996",
  address =      "Portland, OR",
  abstract =     "Research into the utility of non--coding segments, or
                 introns, in genetic--based encodings has shown that
                 they expedite the evolution of solutions in domains by
                 protecting building blocks against destructive
                 crossover. We consider a genetic programming system
                 where non--coding segments can be removed, and the
                 resultant chromosomes returned into the population.
                 This parsimonious repair leads to premature
                 convergence, since as we remove the naturally occurring
                 non--coding segments, we strip away their protective
                 backup feature. We then duplicate the coding segments
                 in the repaired chromosomes, and place the modified
                 chromosomes into the population. The duplication method
                 significantly improves the learning rate in the domain
                 we have considered. We also show that this method can
                 be applied to other domains.",
  URL =          "http://www.cs.twsu.edu/~haynes/duplicate.ps",
}